prachisrivas,
@prachisrivas@masto.ai avatar

'The number of retractions issued for research articles in 2023 has passed 10,000 — smashing annual records — as publishers struggle to clean up a slew of sham papers and peer-review fraud.'

Not sure if this happens but there should be a red banner on journal article download pages stating 'retracted'. I don't think most people will check before citing, and there should be alerts in reference management systems too.

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-023-03974-8

@academicchatter

StephanieMoore,
@StephanieMoore@mastodon.online avatar

@prachisrivas @academicchatter also, I have one co-authored paper that was plagiarized, and that plagiarizing paper was since retracted. There is an alert on that article and its page on the journal site. But I still see the citations for it going up. Makes me think some people aren’t even really reading what the cite just grabbing a quick Google search result (no way)

prachisrivas,
@prachisrivas@masto.ai avatar

@StephanieMoore

I'm sorry this happened to you. I think integrated tools in referencing systems to inform people that a paper has been retracted is essential. I agree that it's often obvious that people have cited works without reading them, or having read them a while ago and then not gone back to it. Sometimes, the work is acknowledged as a 'seminal piece' and a signal to readers that the author knows the lay of the land. Citation practices are difficult to work out.

@academicchatter

StephanieMoore,
@StephanieMoore@mastodon.online avatar

@prachisrivas @academicchatter Curious to know what people think warrants retraction. Should that only be reserved for cases like data fabrication or peer review fraud or blatant plagiarism across the entire paper? Or should that also apply to instances when a section of a paper mirrors another paper without attribution?

prachisrivas,
@prachisrivas@masto.ai avatar

@StephanieMoore

The latter would qualify as plagiarism and I believe in most instances would be considered unethical and academic fraud, especially if it is a concerted pattern. But yes, these are nuanced and important discussions to be had.

@academicchatter

kdund,
@kdund@snabelen.no avatar

@StephanieMoore @prachisrivas @academicchatter Any amount of plagiarism warrants retraction IMO. Exception if it was a paper by one of the authors.
(retraction is also a valid option for honest mistakes if it turns out that some error makes the entire paper moot, paper retraction is not a punishment in itself, just a statement that either the journal or the authors think the paper should not be considered anymore )

prachisrivas,
@prachisrivas@masto.ai avatar

@kdund

The latter part of your point is particularly important and a nuance that is often forgotten. Retractions may even be a way for authors to take theories/ideas outside of the public academic sphere that they find, on further assessment and analysis, to no longer be valid.

@StephanieMoore @academicchatter

kdund,
@kdund@snabelen.no avatar

@prachisrivas @StephanieMoore @academicchatter
Yep! same with an erratum-- my errata for my PhD thesis is a reminder that someone read it carefully :D

kdund,
@kdund@snabelen.no avatar

@StephanieMoore @prachisrivas @academicchatter
At least PRL makes that big red meessage, but that may not propagate everywhere, such as when I copy/paste reference bibtexes from inspirehep

prachisrivas,
@prachisrivas@masto.ai avatar

@kdund

I think integrated reference manager/citation systems alerts are absolutely key. We cannot keep up especially with publication time lags.

@StephanieMoore

kdund,
@kdund@snabelen.no avatar

@prachisrivas @StephanieMoore Another reminder I should start using zotero over bibdesk..

prachisrivas,
@prachisrivas@masto.ai avatar

@kdund

Does Zotero tell you if something is retracted?

kdund,
@kdund@snabelen.no avatar

@prachisrivas
Just checked-- you get a big red alert:

prachisrivas,
@prachisrivas@masto.ai avatar

@kdund

Ooo!!! Amazing! Wow. Done. Thanks for this. I learned something seriously useful today. :)

@academicchatter @StephanieMoore

rustoleumlove,
@rustoleumlove@mastodon.online avatar
prachisrivas,
@prachisrivas@masto.ai avatar

@rustoleumlove

Thanks, Anne. I haven't come across one yet but it's likely because it may be less common in the fields I usually work. This is helpful.

@academicchatter

rustoleumlove,
@rustoleumlove@mastodon.online avatar

@prachisrivas @academicchatter

you're welcome!

if you are interested in this stuff, i highly recommend the Retraction Watch blog, which i have been reading for years.

yuo can also just go right to the 'official' list of recent (biomedical focused) retractions at the Office of Research Integrity at HHS dot Gov (links below), which i used to check like once every few months. they always catch someone new.

https://retractionwatch.com/

https://ori.hhs.gov/

  • All
  • Subscribed
  • Moderated
  • Favorites
  • random
  • uselessserver093
  • Food
  • aaaaaaacccccccce
  • [email protected]
  • test
  • CafeMeta
  • testmag
  • MUD
  • RhythmGameZone
  • RSS
  • dabs
  • Socialism
  • KbinCafe
  • TheResearchGuardian
  • oklahoma
  • feritale
  • SuperSentai
  • KamenRider
  • All magazines